Graduate Seminars

February 8, 2019

Toward a Distributed and Automated Control Framework in Power Systems

Dr. Ali Bidram, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico

When: Friday, February 8, 2019, 3:30 - 4:30 PM
Where: MECH 218

Abstract

Abstract Conventional electric power systems are facing continuous and rapid changes to alleviate environmental concerns, address governmental incentives, and respond to the consumer demands. The notion of the smart grid has emerged to introduce an intelligent electric network. Improved reliability and sustainability are among desired characteristics of smart grid affecting the distribution level. These attributes are mainly realized through microgrids which facilitate the effective integration of distributed generators (DG). Microgrids can operate in both grid-connected and islanded operating modes. Proper control of microgrid is a prerequisite for stable and economically efficient operation. Microgrid technical challenges are mainly realized through the hierarchical control structure, including primary, secondary, and tertiary control levels. Primary control level is locally implemented at each DG, while the secondary and tertiary control levels are conventionally implemented through a centralized control structure. The centralized structure requires a central controller which increases the reliability concerns by posing the single point of failure. Alternatively, the distributed control structure using the distributed cooperative control of multi-agent systems can be exploited to increase the secondary control reliability. The secondary control objectives are microgrid voltage and frequency, and DG active and reactive powers. Fully distributed control protocols can be implemented through distributed communication networks. Since the DG dynamics are nonlinear and non-identical, input-output feedback linearization can be used to transform the nonlinear dynamics of DGs to linear dynamics. The transformed dynamics of DGs are then being used in the design of distributed control protocols. In the distributed control structure, each DG only requires its own information and the information of its neighbors on the communication network. The distributed structure obviates the requirements for a central controller and complex communication network which, in turn, improves the system reliability.

About the Speaker

Dr. Michael Bilka received his PhD from the von Karman Institute and Vrije Universiteit Brussels in Belgium. From there he moved to the University of Notre Dame as a postdoctoral researcher. He then stayed on as Senior Scientist in the Notre Dame Turbomachinery laboratory and held a concurrent appointment as a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. In 2017 he left Notre Dame to join Ball Aerospace in Albuquerque where he currently works as a Research Engineer in the Effects, Research and Analysis group. His research interests include high speed and high enthalpy flows, turbomachinery flows, flow induced sound and vibration and unsteady instrumentation development.


February 1, 2019

Unsteady measurement techniques with application to turbomachinery flows and sound generation

Dr. Michael Bilka, Research Engineer, Effects, Research and Analysis, Group Ball Aerospace

When: Friday, February 1, 2019, 3:30 - 4:30 PM
Where: MECH 218

Abstract

Continued development of advanced simulation and design tools required increased fidelity measurements for verification and validation and detailed physical understanding. Many fluid flow problems of technological interest involve complex geometries and unsteady, turbulent flows. The development and validation of unsteady measurement techniques is needed to help further develop design and computational tools to advance quieter and more efficient technologies. In this talk the development of unsteady pressure and temperature instruments will be discussed. These techniques will be applied to turbomachinery and sound generating flows to help elucidate important flow f eatures that can lead to improved component efficiency and decreased sound generation.

About the Speaker

Dr. Bidram is currently an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. He has received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from Isfahan University of Technology, Iran, in 2008 and 2010, and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Arlington, USA, in 2014. Before joining the University of New Mexico, he worked with Quanta Technology, LLC, and was involved in a wide range of projects in the electric power industry. He is an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications. His areas of expertise lie within control and coordination of energy assets in power electronics-intensive energy distribution grids. Such research efforts have culminated in a book, several journal papers in top publication venues and articles in peer-reviewed conference proceedings, and technical reports. He has received the University of Texas at Arlington N. M. Stelmakh outstanding student research award, Quanta Technology Shooting Start award, and cover article of December 2014 in IEEE Control Systems.